The Defilers

The Defilers (1965) movie poster

(1965) directors Lee Frost, David F. Friedman
viewed: 10/12/10

A few years back, I watched a couple of documentaries that dealt with exploitation movies (Mau Mau Sex Sex (2001) and Schlock! The Secret History of American Movies (2001)), and I was inspired to see some of the movies detailed.  Besides a couple of Doris Wishman films (including the brilliant Bad Girls Go to Hell (1965)) and a couple of Dwain Esper films (including the ground-breaking Maniac (1934)), I really didn’t follow up on this all that much.

Nor do I expect them to all be as radical and amazing as those two surprises.

The Defilers is one of the few films to earn a “director” credit for David F. Friedman, though he shares it with Lee Frost for the film.  Friedman was more of a producer, the show man, than the “artist” himself.  But that said, The Defilers, while not achieving the strange surreal or even political slant of Wishman’s Bad Girls Go to Hell, it does have a fairly polished, low-cost aesthetic, telling the tale of a rampage of two young men and their sexual escapades, in particular their kidnapping  and raping of a young woman.

For the most part, the film is a series of make-out scenes, including a fair amount of T & A, but the leads, two young men, bored and yearning for “kicks” portrays a sense of ennui and priveledge, while they booze it up and get high.  The exploitation factor is mostly the nudie cuties, but is also based on the rough and brutal treatment of the women, particularly by the wealthier one, who has a penchant for beating women.  And most disturbingly, one of them in particular is portrayed to like it.

Unlike the Wishman and Esper films, The Defilers isn’t inspiring for artistry or shock, though it’s not uninteresting or poorly made.  Friedman’s biggest successes were with Herschell Gordon Lewis in the directorial chair.  So, I’ll have to get some of those to the top of the queue.

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