Creature (1985)

Creature (1985) movie poster

director William Malone
viewed: 09/25/2015

Of all the Alien (1979) knock-offs in all the solar systems of the world…

Actually, after completing re-watching the Alien series a few years back, I got kind of interested in the Alien knock-offs.  I did get around to watching both Galaxy of Terror (1981) and Forbidden World (1982), both Roger Corman productions with various strengths and weaknesses.  Ultimately, I kind of petered out on the subject before getting to them all.

Creature, though, is most certainly an Alien rip-off, rather unabashedly, though also rather abysmally.  What Alien had going in originality, style, design, and production value, Creature has…well, none of those things.

In a race for mining rights on the moon Titan, a German team and a US team land in a race to land first dibs.  What they land first dibs on is death at the hand of an ancient monster, stuck in some hibernation sleep for hundreds of millennia.   On top of a very poor man’s version of the Alien monster, it also has a parasitic brain thing that allows it to reanimate corpses and use human trickery to lure unknowing spacefolk to various forms of death.

This is a D-list film with a C-list cast.  The biggest star is an old and avidly screen-chewing Klaus Kinski as an (unsurprisingly) evil German spaceman.  It also features Lyman Ward (the dad from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986) anyone?) as well as Diane Salinger (Simone from Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (1985)), the latter as the big tough space army broad.

As amazingly cheap as this film is, it’s not entirely unappealing.  With a knowing nod to The Thing from Another World (1951), it also in other ways echoes of Mario Bava’s Planet of the Vampires (1965) an admitted influence on the 1979 Alien.

My experience with the Alien knock-offs has yet to have me recommend the venture, nor to complete it myself.

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