Frankenstein Created Woman (1967)

Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) movie poster

director Terrence Fisher
viewed: 08/01/2016

Hammer’s funny but not exactly timely response to Roger Vadim’s And God Created Woman (1956) is the latest entry in my summer of Hammer.  It’s the fourth film in the series, the last one that I hadn’t seen that Netflix still carries on DVD.

People seem to complain about the series, which spanned 17 years and 8 films, the lack of continuity between installments.  But oddly enough, I think that may be one of the series’ unusual strengths.  Rather than picking up where we left off, the films range all around.  Frankenstein is no one-trick pony.  Sometimes he creates a monster or revives his monster, other times he’s trying freeze brains for transposition from head to head, or even reviving a troglodyte!

Interestingly, he does not “create” woman in this film, though you could see where they were going, the Bride of Frankenstein is an element of Mary Shelley’s original novel.  He literally creates a woman (out of parts of other women).  But no, here he’s capturing the “soul” and taking it from one dead guy into his old dead girlfriend’s head, bringing her back to life, and even fixing some nasty facial scars that had diminished her life.

But the soul of the vengeful beau convinces the lovely Christina (Susan Denberg) to hunt down her father’s killers, the men for whom the young Hans (Robert Morris) took the fall for.

Peter Cushing is back as the doctor, supported by the affable Doctor Hertz (Thorley Walters).  And though the film isn’t overly amazing, it’s surprisingly affecting.

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